Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Configuring Spring Boot Actuator information in Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.9 Applications Manager

With the release of Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.9 we added "Spring Boot Actuator In PCF" through Applications Manager Web UI. In this example below I will show what config you need on your application side to get Apps Manager Web UI to show you this information.

Spring Boot Actuator exposes information about a running Spring Boot application via an http endpoint. Get useful diagnostics about an app programmatically using these RESTful APIs:  health, git commit, build information, and so on. Now, developers can view some of this data in PCF Apps Manager. It’s easier to debug and monitor your apps in production, since Apps Manager shows this diagnostics info in context.

The steps are are described here BUT the steps below are more detailed and provide a sample application to verify this with.

http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-9/console/spring-boot-actuators.html

1. Add the maven dependency "spring-boot-starter-actuator" to your pom.xml

  
<dependencies>
    <dependency> 
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

2. Ensure your using Spring Boot 1.5 snapshots/release candidates/final as earlier versions won't work.
  
<parent>
  <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
  <version>1.5.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
  <relativePath/> <!-- lookup parent from repository -->
</parent>

https://spring.io/blog/2017/01/06/spring-boot-1-5-0-rc1-available-now

3. Configure the Info Actuator as per link below

http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-9/console/spring-boot-actuators.html#info-endpoint

Note: It will differ depending on if your using Maven or Gradle

Ensure you add this property for GIT integration in your YML file or properties file, YML example

management:
  info:
    git:
      mode: full

4. The following demo below has the required setup for verification application , clone and push to CF as shown below.

Note: review pom.xml for everything that is needed for this to work

https://github.com/papicella/SpringBootPCFPas

$ git clone https://github.com/papicella/SpringBootPCFPas.git
$ mvn package
$ cf push -f manifest-inmemory-db.yml

....

0 of 1 instances running, 1 starting
0 of 1 instances running, 1 starting
1 of 1 instances running

App started


OK

App pas-springboot-pcf was started using this command `CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.2_RELEASE -memorySizes=metaspace:64m..,stack:228k.. -memoryWeights=heap:65,metaspace:10,native:15,stack:10 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100% -stackThreads=300 -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) && JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY -Djava.security.egd=file:///dev/urando" && SERVER_PORT=$PORT eval exec $PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java $JAVA_OPTS -cp $PWD/. org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher`

Showing health and status for app pas-springboot-pcf in org pivot-papicella / space development as papicella@pivotal.io...
OK

requested state: started
instances: 1/1
usage: 1G x 1 instances
urls: pas-springboot-pcf-squireless-clicha.cfapps.pez.pivotal.io
last uploaded: Wed Jan 11 03:59:24 UTC 2017
stack: cflinuxfs2
buildpack: java-buildpack=v3.10-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#193d6b7 java-main java-opts open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_111 open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.2_RELEASE spring-auto-reconfiguration=1.10.0_RELEASE

     state     since                    cpu      memory         disk           details
#0   running   2017-01-11 03:00:18 PM   207.1%   489.9M of 1G   161.7M of 1G

5. View the application in Application Manager UI as shown below and you will see that a Spring Icon appears next to the application name



More Screen Shots





More Information

http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-9/console/spring-boot-actuators.html

Monday, 9 January 2017

Spring Boot Application Consuming NAB FxRates API

National Australia Bank (NAB) recently released a set of BETA API's as per the link below.

https://developer.nab.com.au/

The following example is a Spring Boot Application that consumes the FxRates API. It's all documented on GitHub and you will need a NAB API key to run this demo. It can run stand alone as a FAT JAR through Spring Boot or deployed to Cloud Foundry, instructions appear for both.

https://github.com/papicella/NABApi-fx-demo

 

Tuesday, 20 December 2016

Script to tally Application Instance Counts for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

I was recently asked how to determine how many application instances exist in a given ORG at a point in time. The script below can do this using CF CURL command which means you must be logged into your Pivotal Cloud Foundry instance for this to work. You can use the CF REST API itself but I find the CF CURL much easier.

CF REST API https://apidocs.cloudfoundry.org/249/

The script below is assuming an ORG name of "apples-pivotal-org" so it would make sense to pass this in as a script variable which is easy enough to do

Prior to running this script it's worth checking your current TARGET endpoints as shown below.

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/PCF/scripts$ cf target

API endpoint:   https://api.run.pivotal.io (API version: 2.65.0)
User:           papicella@pivotal.io
Org:            apples-pivotal-org
Space:          development

Script:

echo "AI Count for applications in a organization.."
echo ""

guids=$(cf curl /v2/apps?q=organization_guid:`cf org apples-pivotal-org --guid` | jq -r ".resources[].metadata.guid")
total=0
for guid in $guids; do
  name=$(cf curl /v2/apps/$guid | jq -r ".entity.name")
  count=$(cf curl /v2/apps/$guid | jq -r ".entity.instances")
  echo -e "App Name: $name , Instances: $count"
  total=$(( $total + $count ))
done

echo "-----"
echo "Total AI's = $total"
echo ""

Output:

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/PCF/scripts$ ./ai-count-org-details.sh
AI Count for applications in a organization..

App Name: pas-telstrawifiapi-client , Instances: 1
App Name: springboot-bootstrap-employee , Instances: 2
App Name: springboot-employee-feign-client , Instances: 1
App Name: greeting-config , Instances: 1
App Name: employee-feign-client-hystrix , Instances: 1
App Name: pas-albums , Instances: 2
App Name: pas-springboot-pcf , Instances: 2
App Name: springboot-typeahead , Instances: 1
-----
Total AI's = 11

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Spring Boot with Feign and Twitter Typeahead JS library

I previously blogged about a demo using Spring Boot and Feign making an external based REST call to a service I had created. The real purpose of that demo "http://theblasfrompas.blogspot.com.au/2016/12/spring-boot-feign-client-accessing.html" was to use Twitter Typeahead for auto completion which is the demo on Github below. The returned data is now used in an INPUT text input for auto completion as the user types in the Country Name

https://github.com/papicella/FeignClientExternalSpringBoot


Friday, 9 December 2016

Spring Boot / Feign Client accessing external service

Previously we used Feign to create clients for our own services, which are registered on our Eureka Server using a service name as shown in the previous blog post http://theblasfrompas.blogspot.com.au/2016/11/declarative-rest-client-feign-with_8.html. It's not unusual that you'd want to implement an external rest endpoint, basically an endpoint that's not discoverable by Eureka. In that case, you can use the url property on the @FeignClient annotation,
which gracefully supports property injection. His an example of this.

Full example on GitHub as follows

https://github.com/papicella/FeignClientExternalSpringBoot

1. Start by adding the correct maven dependencies and the one you need is as follows, there would be others if you want to use a web based spring boot project etc.

  
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-feign</artifactId>
</dependency>

2. We are going to consume this external service as follows

http://country.io/names.json

To do that we create a simple interface as follows
  
package pas.au.pivotal.feign.external;

import org.springframework.cloud.netflix.feign.FeignClient;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;

@FeignClient(name = "country-service-client", url = "http://country.io")
public interface CountryServiceClient {

    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET, value = "/names.json")
    String getCountries();
}

3. In this example I have created a RestController to consume this REST service and test it because it's the easiest way to do this. We simply AutoWire the CountryServiceClient interface into the RestController to make those external calls through FEIGN.
  
package pas.au.pivotal.feign.external.controller;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParser;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParserFactory;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import pas.au.pivotal.feign.external.CountryServiceClient;

import java.util.Map;

@RestController
public class CountryRest
{
    Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(CountryRest.class);
    private static final JsonParser parser = JsonParserFactory.getJsonParser();

    @Autowired
    private CountryServiceClient countryServiceClient;

    @RequestMapping(value = "/countries", method = RequestMethod.GET, 
                         produces = "application/json")
    public String allCountries()
    {
        String countries = countryServiceClient.getCountries();

        return countries;
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/country_names", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String[] countryNames ()
    {
        String countries = countryServiceClient.getCountries();

        Map<String, Object> countryMap = parser.parseMap(countries);

        String countryArray[] = new String[countryMap.size()];
        logger.info("Size of countries " + countryArray.length);

        int i = 0;
        for (Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : countryMap.entrySet()) {
            countryArray[i] = (String) entry.getValue();
            i++;
        }

        return countryArray;

    }
}

4. Of course we will have our main class to boot strap the application and it includes the "spring-boot-starter-web" maven repo to start a tomcat server for us.
  
package pas.au.pivotal.feign.external;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.cloud.netflix.feign.EnableFeignClients;

@SpringBootApplication
@EnableFeignClients
public class FeignClientExternalSpringBootApplication {

 public static void main(String[] args) {
  SpringApplication.run(FeignClientExternalSpringBootApplication.class, args);
 }
} 

5. Ensure your application.properties or application.yml has the following properties to disable timeouts.

feign:
  hystrix:
    enabled: false

hystrix:
  command:
    choose:
      default:
        execution:
          timeout:
            enabled: false

6. Run the main class "FeignClientExternalSpringBootApplication"

Access as follows

http://localhost:8080/countries





Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Deploying Spring Boot Applications on Google Application Engine (GAE)

I previously blogged about how to how to deploy a Spring Boot application to Flexible VM's on Google Cloud Platform as shown below.

http://theblasfrompas.blogspot.com.au/2016/09/spring-boot-on-google-cloud-platform-gcp.html

In this example below I use Google Application Engine (GAE) to deploy a Spring Boot application without using a flexible VM which is a lot faster and what I orginally wanted to do when I did this previously. In short this is using the [Standard environment] option for GAE.

Spring Boot uses Servlet 3.0 APIs to initialize the ServletContext (register Servlets etc.) so you can’t use the same application out of the box in a Servlet 2.5 container. It is however possible to run a Spring Boot application on an older container with some special tools. If you include org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-legacy as a dependency (maintained separately to the core of Spring Boot and currently available at 1.0.2.RELEASE), all you should need to do is create a web.xml and declare a context listener to create the application context and your filters and servlets. The context listener is a special purpose one for Spring Boot, but the rest of it is normal for a Spring application in Servlet 2.5

Visit for more Information:

   http://docs.spring.io/spring-boot/docs/current/reference/htmlsingle/#howto-servlet-2-5 

Steps

1. In order to use Servlet 2.5 and a web.xml we will need to add spring-boot-legacy dependecany to a local maven repoistory as shown below.

$ git clone https://github.com/scratches/spring-boot-legacy
$ cd spring-boot-legacy
$ mvn install

2. Clone and package the GIT REPO as shown below

$ https://github.com/papicella/GoogleAppEngineSpringBoot.git

3. Edit the file ./src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/appengine-web.xml to specify the correct APPLICATION ID which we will target in step 4 as well.

  
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<appengine-web-app xmlns="http://appengine.google.com/ns/1.0">
 <application>fe-papicella</application>
 <version>5</version>
   <threadsafe>true</threadsafe>
 <manual-scaling>
  <instances>1</instances>
 </manual-scaling>
</appengine-web-app>

4. Package as shown below

$ mvn package

5. Target your project for deployment as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/piv-projects/GoogleAppEngineSpringBoot$ gcloud projects list
PROJECT_ID              NAME                    PROJECT_NUMBER
bionic-vertex-150302    AppEngineSpringBoot     97889500330
fe-papicella            FE-papicella            1049163203721
pas-spring-boot-on-gcp  Pas Spring Boot on GCP  1043917887789

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/piv-projects/GoogleAppEngineSpringBoot$ gcloud config set project fe-papicella
Updated property [core/project].

6. Deploy as follows

mvn appengine:deploy

Finally once deployed you can access you application using it's endpoint which is displayed in the dashboard of GCP console





Project in InteiilJ IDEA




NOTE: Google AppEngine does not allow JMX, so you have to switch it off in a Spring Boot app (set spring.jmx.enabled=false in application.properties).

application.properties

spring.jmx.enabled=false

More Information

Full working example with code as follows on GitHub

https://github.com/papicella/GoogleAppEngineSpringBoot

Friday, 18 November 2016

Uploading Tiles into Pivotal Cloud Foundry Operations Manager from the Ops Manager VM directly

When deploying PCF, you start by deploying Ops Manager. This is basically a VM that you deploy into your IaaS system of choice and it orchestrates the PCF installation. The installation of PCF is done by you through a web interface that runs on the Ops Manager VM. Into that web interface, you can load various "tiles". Each tile provides a specific set of functionality.

For example, Ops Manager comes with a tile for Bosh Director. This is the only out-of-the-box tile, as all the other tiles depend on it. Most users will first install the PCF tile. This provides the Cloud Foundry installation. After that, tiles generally provide functionality for services. Popular tiles include MySQL, RabbitMQ and Redis. There are quite a few tiles in total now, you can see them all listed on https://network.pivotal.io.



Some tiles are quite large , for example the "Elastic Runtime" tile in PCF 1.8 is 5G so from Australia I don't want to a 5G file to my laptop then upload it into the Ops Manager Web UI so here is how you can import tiles directly from the Ops Manager VM itself

1. Log into the Ops Manager VM using SSH with your keyfile.

Note: 0.0.0.0 is a bogus ip address for obvious reasons

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install/ops-manager-key$ ssh -i ubuntu-key ubuntu@0.0.0.0
Welcome to Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (GNU/Linux 4.4.0-47-generic x86_64)

 * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com/

  System information as of Wed Nov 16 23:36:27 UTC 2016

  System load:  0.0                Processes:           119
  Usage of /:   36.4% of 49.18GB   Users logged in:     0
  Memory usage: 37%                IP address for eth0: 10.0.0.0
  Swap usage:   0%

  Graph this data and manage this system at:
    https://landscape.canonical.com/

  Get cloud support with Ubuntu Advantage Cloud Guest:
    http://www.ubuntu.com/business/services/cloud

Your Hardware Enablement Stack (HWE) is supported until April 2019.

Last login: Wed Nov 16 23:36:30 2016 from 0.0.0.0
ubuntu@myvm-gcp:~$

2. Log into https://network.pivotal.io/ and click on "Edit Profile" as shown below


3. Locate your "API token" and record it we will need it shortly

4. In this example I am uploading the "Pivotal Cloud Foundry Elastic Runtime" tile so navigate to the correct file and select the "i" icon to reveal the API endpoint for the tile.


5. Issue a wget command as follows which has a format as follows. This will download the 5G file into the HOME directory. Wait for this to complete before moving to the next step.

wget {file-name} --post-data="" --header="Authorization: Token {TOKEN-FROM-STEP-3" {API-LOCATION-URL}

$ wget -O cf-1.8.14-build.7.pivotal  --post-data="" --header="Authorization: Token {TOKEN-FROM-STEP-3" https://network.pivotal.io/api/v2/products/elastic-runtime/releases/2857/product_files/9161/download

6. Retrieve an access token which will need us to use the username/password for the Ops Manager admin account.

curl -s -k -H 'Accept: application/json;charset=utf-8' -d 'grant_type=password' -d 'username=admin' -d 'password=OPSMANAGER-ADMIN-PASSWD' -u 'opsman:' https://localhost/uaa/oauth/token

$ curl -s -k -H 'Accept: application/json;charset=utf-8' -d 'grant_type=password' -d 'username=admin' -d 'password=welcome1' -u 'opsman:' https://localhost/uaa/oauth/token
{"access_token":"eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImtpZCI6ImxlZ2Fj ...... "

7. Finally upload the tile to be imported from the Ops Manager UI using a format as follows. You need to make sure you use the correct file name as per the download from STEP 5

curl -v -H "Authorization: Bearer STEP6-ACCESS-TOKEN" 'https://localhost/api/products' -F 'product[file]=@/home/ubuntu/cf-1.8.14-build.7.pivotal'  -X POST -k

Once complete you should see the Tile in Ops Manager as shown below. This is much faster way to upload tiles especially from Australia



More Information

https://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-8/customizing/pcf-interface.html

Thursday, 17 November 2016

Installing Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) on Google Cloud Platform (GCP)

I decided to install PCF 1.8 onto Google Cloud Platform today and I thought the experience was fantastic and very straight forward. The GCP Console is fantastic and very powerful indeed. The steps to install it are as follows

http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-8/customizing/gcp.html

Here are some screen shots you would expect to see along the way when using Operations Manager

Screen Shots 










Finally Once Installed here is how to create an ORG, USER and get started using the CLI. You will note you must log in as ADMIN to get started and finally I log in as the user who will be the OrgManager.

** Target my PCF Instance **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf api https://api.system.pas-apples.online --skip-ssl-validation
Setting api endpoint to https://api.system.pas-apples.online...
OK


API endpoint:   https://api.system.pas-apples.online (API version: 2.58.0)
Not logged in. Use 'cf login' to log in.

** Login as ADMIN **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf login -u admin -p YYYY -o system -s system
API endpoint: https://api.system.pas-apples.online
Authenticating...
OK

Targeted org system

Targeted space system

API endpoint:   https://api.system.pas-apples.online (API version: 2.58.0)
User:           admin
Org:            system
Space:          system

** Create Org **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf create-org gcp-pcf-org
Creating org gcp-pcf-org as admin...
OK

Assigning role OrgManager to user admin in org gcp-pcf-org ...
OK

TIP: Use 'cf target -o gcp-pcf-org' to target new org

** Create a USER **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf create-user pas YYYY
Creating user pas...
OK

TIP: Assign roles with 'cf set-org-role' and 'cf set-space-role'

** Set ORG Role **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf set-org-role pas gcp-pcf-org OrgManager
Assigning role OrgManager to user pas in org gcp-pcf-org as admin...
OK

** Target the newly created ORG **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf target -o gcp-pcf-org

API endpoint:   https://api.system.pas-apples.online (API version: 2.58.0)
User:           admin
Org:            gcp-pcf-org
Space:          No space targeted, use 'cf target -s SPACE'

** Create a SPACE **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf create-space development
Creating space development in org gcp-pcf-org as admin...
OK
Assigning role RoleSpaceManager to user admin in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as admin...
OK
Assigning role RoleSpaceDeveloper to user admin in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as admin...
OK

TIP: Use 'cf target -o "gcp-pcf-org" -s "development"' to target new space

** Set Some Space Roles **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf set-space-role pas gcp-pcf-org development SpaceDeveloper
Assigning role RoleSpaceDeveloper to user pas in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as admin...
OK
pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf set-space-role pas gcp-pcf-org development SpaceManager
Assigning role RoleSpaceManager to user pas in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as admin...
OK

** Login as PAS user and target the correct ORG/SPACE **

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/GCP/install$ cf login -u pas -p YYYY -o gcp-pcf-org -s development
API endpoint: https://api.system.pas-apples.online
Authenticating...
OK

Targeted org gcp-pcf-org

Targeted space development

API endpoint:   https://api.system.pas-apples.online (API version: 2.58.0)
User:           pas
Org:            gcp-pcf-org
Space:          development

Lets push a simple application

Application manifest.yml

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/piv-projects/PivotalSpringBootJPA$ cat manifest-inmemory-db.yml
applications:
- name: pas-albums
  memory: 512M
  instances: 1
  random-route: true
  path: ./target/PivotalSpringBootJPA-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.jar
  env:
    JAVA_OPTS: -Djava.security.egd=file:///dev/urando

Deploy

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/piv-projects/PivotalSpringBootJPA$ cf push -f manifest-inmemory-db.yml
Using manifest file manifest-inmemory-db.yml

Creating app pas-albums in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as pas...
OK

Creating route pas-albums-gloomful-synapse.apps.pas-apples.online...
OK

Binding pas-albums-gloomful-synapse.apps.pas-apples.online to pas-albums...
OK

Uploading pas-albums...
Uploading app files from: /var/folders/c3/27vscm613fjb6g8f5jmc2x_w0000gp/T/unzipped-app341113312
Uploading 31.6M, 195 files
Done uploading
OK

Starting app pas-albums in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as pas...

0 of 1 instances running, 1 starting
0 of 1 instances running, 1 starting
0 of 1 instances running, 1 starting
1 of 1 instances running

App started

OK

App pas-albums was started using this command `CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.2_RELEASE -memorySizes=metaspace:64m..,stack:228k.. -memoryWeights=heap:65,metaspace:10,native:15,stack:10 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100% -stackThreads=300 -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) && JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY -Djava.security.egd=file:///dev/urando" && SERVER_PORT=$PORT eval exec $PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java $JAVA_OPTS -cp $PWD/. org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher`

Showing health and status for app pas-albums in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as pas...
OK

requested state: started
instances: 1/1
usage: 512M x 1 instances
urls: pas-albums-gloomful-synapse.apps.pas-apples.online
last uploaded: Thu Nov 17 03:39:04 UTC 2016
stack: cflinuxfs2
buildpack: java-buildpack=v3.8.1-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#29c79f2 java-main java-opts open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_91-unlimited-crypto open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.2_RELEASE spring-auto-reconfiguration=1.10.0_RELEASE

     state     since                    cpu      memory           disk         details
#0   running   2016-11-17 02:39:57 PM   142.6%   333.1M of 512M   161M of 1G

Get Route to Application

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/piv-projects/PivotalSpringBootJPA$ cf apps
Getting apps in org gcp-pcf-org / space development as pas...
OK

name         requested state   instances   memory   disk   urls
pas-albums   started           1/1         512M     1G     pas-albums-gloomful-synapse.apps.pas-apples.online






More Information

https://cloud.google.com/solutions/cloud-foundry-on-gcp

Tuesday, 15 November 2016

Accessing the Cloud Foundry REST API from SpringBoot

Accessing the Cloud Foundry REST API is simple enough to do as shown in the example below using curl we can list all our organizations.

Cloud Foundry REST API - https://apidocs.cloudfoundry.org/246/

Below shows just the organizations name and I am filtering on that using JQ, if you wnat to see all the output then remove the PIPE or JQ. You have to be logged in to use "cf oauth-token"

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/apps$ curl -k "https://api.run.pivotal.io/v2/organizations" -X GET -H "Authorization: `cf oauth-token`" | jq -r ".resources[].entity.name"

APJ
apples-pivotal-org
Suncorp

In the example below I will show how you would invoke this REST API using SpringBoot's RestTemplate.

1.  Firstly we need to retrieve our bearer token as we will need that for all API calls into the CF REST API. The code below will retrieve that for us using the RestTemplate

  
package com.pivotal.platform.pcf;

import org.apache.tomcat.util.codec.binary.Base64;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParser;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParserFactory;
import org.springframework.http.HttpEntity;
import org.springframework.http.HttpHeaders;
import org.springframework.http.MediaType;
import org.springframework.web.client.RestTemplate;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Map;

public class Utils
{
    private final static String username = "papicella@pivotal.io";
    private final static String password = "PASSWORD";
    private static final Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(Utils.class);
    private static final JsonParser parser = JsonParserFactory.getJsonParser();

    public static String getAccessToken ()
    {
        String uri = "https://login.run.pivotal.io/oauth/token";
        String data = "username=%s&password=%s&client_id=cf&grant_type=password&response_type=token";
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();

        // HTTP POST call with data

        HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();

        headers.add("Authorization", "Basic " + encodePassword());
        headers.add("Content-Type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");

        headers.setAccept(Arrays.asList(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON));

        String postArgs = String.format(data, username, password);

        HttpEntity<String> requestEntity = new HttpEntity<String>(postArgs,headers);

        String response = restTemplate.postForObject(uri, requestEntity, String.class);

        Map<String, Object> jsonMap = parser.parseMap(response);

        String accessToken = (String) jsonMap.get("access_token");

        return accessToken;
    }

    private static String encodePassword()
    {
        String auth = "cf:";
        byte[] plainCredsBytes = auth.getBytes();
        byte[] base64CredsBytes = Base64.encodeBase64(plainCredsBytes);
        return new String(base64CredsBytes);
    }

}

To achieve the same thing as above using CURL would look as follows, I have stripped the actual bearer token as that is a lot of TEXT.

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~$ curl -v -XPOST -H "Application/json" -u "cf:" --data "username=papicella@pivotal.io&password=PASSWORD&client_id=cf&grant_type=password&response_type=token" https://login.run.pivotal.io/oauth/token

...

{"access_token":"YYYYYYYYYYY ....","token_type":"bearer","refresh_token":"3dd9a2b63f3640c38eb8220e2ae88dfc-r","expires_in":599,"scope":"openid uaa.user cloud_controller.read password.write cloud_controller.write","jti":"c3706c86e376445686a0dd289262bbfa"}

2. Once we have the bearer token we can then make calls to the CF REST API using the bearer token as shown below. The code below simply ensures we get the bearer token before we make the calls to the CF REST API and then we are free to output what we want to output. One method below simply returns the RAW JSON output as per the method "getAllApps" and the other method "getAllOrgs" to get Organizations strips out what we don't want and adds it to a list of POJO that define exactly what we want to return.
  
package com.pivotal.platform.pcf;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.pivotal.platform.pcf.beans.Organization;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParser;
import org.springframework.boot.json.JsonParserFactory;
import org.springframework.http.HttpEntity;
import org.springframework.http.HttpHeaders;
import org.springframework.http.HttpMethod;
import org.springframework.http.MediaType;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import org.springframework.web.client.RestTemplate;

import java.util.*;

@RestController
public class CFRestAPISpringBoot
{
    private RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
    private static final Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(CFRestAPISpringBoot.class);
    private static final JsonParser parser = JsonParserFactory.getJsonParser();

    @RequestMapping(value = "/cf-apps", method = RequestMethod.GET, path = "/cf-apps")
    public String getAllApps ()
    {
        String uri = "https://api.run.pivotal.io/v2/apps";

        String accessToken = Utils.getAccessToken();

        // Make CF REST API call for Applications
        HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();
        headers.set("Authorization", String.format("Bearer %s", accessToken));
        headers.setAccept(Arrays.asList(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON));

        HttpEntity entity = new HttpEntity(headers);

        log.info("CF REST API Call - " + uri);

        HttpEntity<String> response = restTemplate.exchange(uri, HttpMethod.GET, entity, String.class);

        return response.getBody();
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/cf-orgs", method = RequestMethod.GET, path = "/cf-orgs")
    public List<Organization> getAllOrgs ()
    {
        String uri = "https://api.run.pivotal.io/v2/organizations";

        String accessToken = Utils.getAccessToken();

        // Make CF REST API call for Applications
        HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();
        headers.set("Authorization", String.format("Bearer %s", accessToken));
        headers.setAccept(Arrays.asList(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON));

        HttpEntity entity = new HttpEntity(headers);

        log.info("CF REST API Call - " + uri);
        HttpEntity<String> response = restTemplate.exchange(uri, HttpMethod.GET, entity, String.class);

        log.info(response.getBody());

        Map<String, Object> jsonMap = parser.parseMap(response.getBody());

        List<Object> resourcesList = (List<Object>) jsonMap.get("resources");
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        ArrayList<Organization> orgs = new ArrayList<Organization>();

        for (Object item: resourcesList)
        {
            Map map = (Map) item;

            Iterator entries = map.entrySet().iterator();

            while (entries.hasNext())
            {
                Map.Entry thisEntry = (Map.Entry) entries.next();
                if (thisEntry.getKey().toString().equals("entity"))
                {
                    Map entityMap = (Map) thisEntry.getValue();
                    Organization org =
                            new Organization((String)entityMap.get("name"),
                                             (String)entityMap.get("status"),
                                             (String)entityMap.get("spaces_url"));
                    log.info(org.toString());
                    orgs.add(org);
                }

            }

        }

        return orgs;
    }
} 

3. Of course we have the standard SpringBoot main class which ensures we us an embedded tomcat server to server the REST end points
  
package com.pivotal.platform.pcf;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

@SpringBootApplication
public class SpringBootCfRestApiApplication {

 public static void main(String[] args)
 {
  SpringApplication.run(SpringBootCfRestApiApplication.class, args);
 }
}

4. The POJO is as follows
  
package com.pivotal.platform.pcf.beans;

public final class Organization
{
    private String name;
    private String status;
    private String spacesUrl;

    public Organization()
    {
    }

    public Organization(String name, String status, String spacesUrl) {
        this.name = name;
        this.status = status;
        this.spacesUrl = spacesUrl;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getStatus() {
        return status;
    }

    public void setStatus(String status) {
        this.status = status;
    }

    public String getSpacesUrl() {
        return spacesUrl;
    }

    public void setSpacesUrl(String spacesUrl) {
        this.spacesUrl = spacesUrl;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Organization{" +
                "name='" + name + '\'' +
                ", status='" + status + '\'' +
                ", spacesUrl='" + spacesUrl + '\'' +
                '}';
    }
} 

Once our Spring Boot application is running we can simply invoke one of the REST end points as follows and it will login as well as make the REST call using the CF REST API under the covers for us.

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/apps$ curl http://localhost:8080/cf-orgs | jq -r
[
  {
    "name": "APJ",
    "status": "active",
    "spacesUrl": "/v2/organizations/b7ec654f-f7fd-40e2-a4f7-841379d396d7/spaces"
  },
  {
    "name": "apples-pivotal-org",
    "status": "active",
    "spacesUrl": "/v2/organizations/64c067c1-2e19-4d14-aa3f-38c07c46d552/spaces"
  },
  {
    "name": "Suncorp",
    "status": "active",
    "spacesUrl": "/v2/organizations/dd06618f-a062-4fbc-b8e9-7b829d9eaf37/spaces"
  }
]

More Information

1. Cloud Foundry REST API - https://apidocs.cloudfoundry.org/246/

2. RestTemplate - http://docs.spring.io/spring-framework/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/web/client/RestTemplate.html



Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Declarative REST Client Feign with Spring Boot

Feign is a declarative web service client. It makes writing web service clients easier. To use Feign create an interface and annotate it. It has pluggable annotation support including Feign annotations and JAX-RS annotations. Feign also supports pluggable encoders and decoders.

In this example I show how to use Spring Cloud / Spring Boot application with Feign. The source code for this is as follows

https://github.com/papicella/SpringBootEmployeeFeignClient

1. Include the required maven dependency for Feign as shown below

  
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-cloud-starter-feign</artifactId>
</dependency>

2. Assuming your going to lookup a service using Service Discovery with Spring Cloud then include this dependency as well, the example below is doing this using Spring Cloud Service Discovery.


<dependency>
  <groupId>io.pivotal.spring.cloud</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-cloud-services-starter-service-registry</artifactId>
</dependency>


See the Spring Cloud Project page for details on setting up your build system with the current Spring Cloud Release Train

3. To enable Feign we simple add the annotation @EnableFeignClients as shown below


package pas.au.scs.demo;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.cloud.client.discovery.EnableDiscoveryClient;
import org.springframework.cloud.netflix.feign.EnableFeignClients;

@SpringBootApplication
@EnableDiscoveryClient
@EnableFeignClients
public class SpringBootEmployeeFeignClientApplication {

 public static void main(String[] args) {
  SpringApplication.run(SpringBootEmployeeFeignClientApplication.class, args);
 }
}

4. Next we have to create an interface to call our service methods. The interface methods must match the service method signatures as shown below. In this example we use Spring Cloud service discovery to find our service and invoke the right implementation method, Feign can do more then just call registered services through spring cloud service discovery BUT this example does that.

EmployeeServiceClient Interface
 
package pas.au.scs.demo.employee;

import org.springframework.cloud.netflix.feign.FeignClient;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;

import java.util.List;

@FeignClient("SPRINGBOOT-EMPLOYEE-SERVICE")
public interface EmployeeServiceClient
{
    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET, value = "/emps")
    List<Employee> listEmployees();
}

So what does the actual service method look like?


@RestController
public class EmployeeRest
{
    private static Log logger = LogFactory.getLog(EmployeeRest.class);
    private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    @Autowired
    public EmployeeRest(EmployeeRepository employeeRepository)
    {
        this.employeeRepository = employeeRepository;
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/emps",
                    method = RequestMethod.GET,
                    produces = MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE)
    public List<Employee> listEmployees()
    {
        logger.info("REST request to get all Employees");
        List<Employee> emps = employeeRepository.findAll();

        return emps;
    }

    ..... 


5. It's important to note that the Feign client is calling a service method using Spring Cloud service discovery , the screen shot below shows how it looks inside Pivotal Cloud Foundry when we select out service registry instance and click on Manage






6. Finally we just need to call our service using the Feign client interface and do do that with Autowire as required. In this example below we use a class annotated with @Controller as shown below which then using the returned data to display the results to a web page using Thymeleaf

package pas.au.scs.demo.controller;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.ui.Model;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import pas.au.scs.demo.employee.EmployeeServiceClient;

@Controller
public class EmployeeFeignController
{
    Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(EmployeeFeignController.class);

    @Autowired
    private EmployeeServiceClient employeeServiceClient;

    @RequestMapping(value = "/", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String homePage(Model model) throws Exception
    {
        model.addAttribute("employees", employeeServiceClient.listEmployees());

        return "employees";
    }

}

7. The Web page "employees.html" fragment accessing the returned List of employees is as follows.

<div class="col-xs-12">
    <table id="example" class="table table-hover table-bordered table-striped table-condensed">
        <thead>
        <tr>
            <th>Id</th>
            <th>Name</th>
            <th>Job</th>
            <th>Mgr</th>
            <th>Salary</th>
        </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody>
        <tr th:each="employee : ${employees}">
            <td th:text="${employee.id}"></td>
            <td th:text="${employee.name}"></td>
            <td th:text="${employee.job}"></td>
            <td th:text="${employee.mgr}"></td>
            <td th:text="${employee.salary}"></td>
        </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
</div>  

More Information

1. Spring Cloud
http://projects.spring.io/spring-cloud/

2. Declarative REST Client: Feign
http://cloud.spring.io/spring-cloud-netflix/spring-cloud-netflix.html#spring-cloud-feign